Thoughts on the book "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" by Mark Manson?

Jun 26, 2018
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Recently I read the book "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" by Mark Manson, and I loved the message it conveyed. It's basically a self-help book and the key takeaway is that happiness is not a destination that you will one day reach. Happiness comes from solving problems. For example, if you want to start a business, you won't be happy when you have reached X amount of profits. You will be truly happy when you are working to develop and grow your business. This concept really resonated with me. Because whenever we reach a goal that we have been working to reach for months, we feel a fleeting, temporary sort of happiness. Whereas when we're working towards that goal we feel a lot more fulfilled. Can anyone else relate to this?

Also, have you read the book? What are your views on it?
 
Likes: Rae1234
Jul 20, 2018
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#2
Recently I read the book "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" by Mark Manson, and I loved the message it conveyed. It's basically a self-help book and the key takeaway is that happiness is not a destination that you will one day reach. Happiness comes from solving problems. For example, if you want to start a business, you won't be happy when you have reached X amount of profits. You will be truly happy when you are working to develop and grow your business. This concept really resonated with me. Because whenever we reach a goal that we have been working to reach for months, we feel a fleeting, temporary sort of happiness. Whereas when we're working towards that goal we feel a lot more fulfilled. Can anyone else relate to this?

Also, have you read the book? What are your views on it?
I have not read this book but see it each time I go to a book store. I usually take this as a sign from the universe to purchase it, but my list is rather long. However, now you have changed that! This point of view is essential for me right now and I look forward to its change in the way I focus on things. I have always believed that our society is too hyper focused on happiness, not realizing without traumas and difficulties, we could never appreciate the happiness we do have.

For example, another way society seems to be pushing this concept that you need to be happy above all is the ideal that the young adults need to be content in their professions. I don’t agree with this and think true understanding of the self comes in waves of self growth that can only be learned by experiences. Right now our young should be focusing on caring for themselves as they journey towards the realization of happiness for themselves. I think this book relates some of my belief.
 
Jul 30, 2018
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I keep debating about getting this book too! I struggle with never feeling "enough." Like I have not done enough or accomplished enough or been good enough. I will check this book out. Thanks for the review!
 
Likes: bjfdaisy72
Sep 7, 2018
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I haven't actually read the book yet, but I keep seeing it all over the place and have been planning to. Your post kinda makes me want to order a copy now lol. Thanks for sharing your input!
 

Rae1234

New member
Aug 30, 2018
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Well that's going on my list of books to listen to when it comes out in audio form - since I'm too lazy to actually read a book anymore. :)

I just read the introduction on Amazon. It looks intriguing - it says that the focus on positive thinking and be your best self stuff causes us to focus on our shortcomings. I can definitely see how that can be a trap. There's a ton of pressure out there to always be improving. Hard to measure up and drains you of energy. So rewiring ourselves to be happy along the path instead of only when we've reached the goal would take us out of that feedback loop of always noticing our shortcomings or how far away we are from our goals.

The last chapter sounds interesting: Sunny Side of Death.
 
Sep 29, 2018
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I want to read this book as well, if for no other reason than its title. Because I truly would like to reach that magical point, if only for a few hours or maybe even days at a time, where I simply run out of f*cks to give. But the practical side of me knows that this is probably just another repackaged, kitschy self-help book with basically the same played-out content. With that being said, I would pick up a used copy for a couple bucks.