How often do you read a new book?

kkraus

New member
Jul 21, 2018
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#1
I used to be such a bookworm and spent hours just sitting with a book. Now, after graduating from college, I find it very difficult to finish even easy novels. It's beginning to take me an average of almost two months to get through just one!

Has anyone had the same experience? And, how often do you get to finish a new book?
 
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EJDarnell

New member
Jul 11, 2018
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#2
I believe one should read 5 books a year at the very least, that's 2 months per book, but... Maybe just reading one book a year that really captivates you and teaches you lessons?

My great grandmother read the bible every day for 20 something years until she passed away, she was not the most knowledgeable of women but she was knowledgeable in spirit, kind and a very attentive woman.
 
Jul 7, 2018
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#3
I think it depends a lot, reading is not only books. reddit is reading, even facebook could count as reading. And I'm not talking "trash literature" or anything like that. Reading is having a conversation with the author, maybe it'll take you a whole year to talk with someone about certain topic; maybe you are a really talkative person and want to have chats with a lot of guys.

What's really important is reading. Every book teaches a lesson, although one could argue that not all lessons are good.
 
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shelbyk

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Jul 7, 2018
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#4
I too used to be a huge bookworm, and could read for hours and hours on end without stopping. I think the smartphone culture has really had an affect on our attention spans- over the past year or so I have really gotten back into books, but I went through my entire college career and then some years after without reading a single novel. With so much content available at our fingertips, it can be so easy to get distracted and disinterested in books. When I started getting back into reading, it felt so strange that I wasn't able to sit down for more than an hour with the same book- I basically had to "reteach" myself to enjoy reading again. These days, I finish 1-2 books per week. I know that's pretty high, but what helps me get into them is putting my phone out of reach or on totally silent, and not even starting to watch TV in my downtime. Planning on reading is really helpful for getting into it!
 
Jul 8, 2018
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#5
When I'm trying to learn something, I read 1 book a week and take notes, trying to memorize the content.

But otherwise, I'm reading book a month which is totally fine by my standards!

Books are exciting, feel free to venture into unexplored lands and you'll love it!
 
Jul 7, 2018
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#6
I am having the same problem, actually. I am buying more books than I can read. I made it a goal to read at least one book a month and I'm behind by almost 4 months! But I really liked the advice that @shelbyk gave. I have a little son who occupies my attention during the day and then I'm totally exhausted at night. But instead of picking up a book and reading a chapter, I switch on the tv or play on my phone until I fall asleep. Totally unhealthy and I think I'm ready to rededicate my down time to literature.
 

ethanez

New member
Jul 7, 2018
21
2
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#7
I used to be such a bookworm and spent hours just sitting with a book. Now, after graduating from college, I find it very difficult to finish even easy novels. It's beginning to take me an average of almost two months to get through just one!

Has anyone had the same experience? And, how often do you get to finish a new book?
I've had the exact same experience! It is really difficult for me to find a book that I can sink my teeth into now, unfortunately. I have been forcing myself to read a chapter each night but it is a real challenge. I think I need to find a genre and subject that I am really interested in so that I can use reading to learn and distract myself from all the frenzy.
 
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ltk20

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Jul 21, 2018
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#8
I try and do a little reading before bed at night, even if it's just a few pages. Also, I don't know what your job commute is like, but I almost always keep a book in my purse and read on the metro or on a bus. I know a lot of people who drive to work often listen to audiobooks, too.
 

chocory

New member
Jul 8, 2018
22
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#9
I can totally relate to this—when I was younger, I would sit and read the whole day without getting distracted or tired, but nowadays I find myself on the internet instead. I think @shelbyk is right about the smartphone culture, and I really agree with this:
what helps me get into them is putting my phone out of reach or on totally silent, and not even starting to watch TV in my downtime. Planning on reading is really helpful for getting into it!
Also, when I realised that I wanted to dedicate more time to reading, I made a resolution to read at least one book a month. I dedicated a monthly section in my planner to the book I was going to read, and that helped to remind me as well because I look at my planner every day. I'm not sure if you have something like a planner, but maybe if you can put a reminder somewhere you know you'll see it, that might help. Since starting that myself, I've gone from one book a month to one a fortnight, and then to the point where I no longer need to remind myself. I think it's done wonders for my mental health as well. I've always loved reading and the disconnect from 'normal life'.
 
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NewMama

New member
Jul 30, 2018
23
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#10
I'm an English teacher, so I read a lot for work whether it be a book I'm teaching or something for professional development, but it's not satisfying like it is when you choose your own book and just read for pleasure. I used to have much more time to read for pleasure, and now I'm lucky if I can get through 3-4 books a year, most of which I read during the summer months when I'm not reading as much for work. Now that I've had a baby, I can't imagine even getting through that many. I have heard that scheduling reading time in to your day is a good way to relax though, and I'd like to start doing that even if it's only 15 minutes before bed or something.
 

Delia B

New member
Jul 21, 2018
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#11
I've noticed where I go in sections. Sometimes I can read two books a week and then I won't pick up another book for a couple of months. Then when I start reading again, it takes me a bit to get into a book, and then I'm back to reading two books a week.
 

krt2018

New member
Jul 30, 2018
22
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#12
I had this experience as well! I didn't feel like reading much after college but used to sit and read for hours as a kid and teenager. I think it just takes time to get back into it. I definitely took a slow year or two in early adulthood with reading only a handful of books a year, but now I read around 30-50. Just give it time, your love of reading will come back :)
 

nature_boy

New member
Aug 1, 2018
22
8
3
#13
I used to be such a bookworm and spent hours just sitting with a book. Now, after graduating from college, I find it very difficult to finish even easy novels. It's beginning to take me an average of almost two months to get through just one!

Has anyone had the same experience? And, how often do you get to finish a new book?
This happened to me too! I majored in history so I read a ton of books. I think I just felt burnt out after having to read 300 pages a night for four years. It's been a few years since graduation so I'm trying to get back into the routine of reading every night. It's tough! But we all process information so quickly now. I think it's important to give the brain a chance slow down and enjoy the flow of a good novel, magazine, travel guide, or whatever it is you like to read.
 

CBNerd12

New member
Aug 30, 2018
21
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#14
Getting through a book can certainly be difficult, especially given all the responsibilities that being a functional member of society entails...yuck. That being said, as a bookworm like most people in this thread, I find it infinitely more frustrating to not be able to get through a book as quickly or consistently as I would like. The biggest trick that helped me was to try to always have the book that I wanted to finish on me as much as possible. That way I could read a few pages here and there during moments of my life when I would otherwise have nothing to do or be on my phone. I also don't feel like I'm cutting time out of what is otherwise a pretty busy schedule in order to make time for a new book, but if I get sufficiently hooked on the book I'm reading, I might actually try to carve out more time to read during my day. So, for me at least, trying to sneak in some reading when I can both helps me finish a book, but also inspires me to do so. I hope this helps!
 
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Aug 15, 2018
26
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#15
I think it depends a lot, reading is not only books. reddit is reading, even facebook could count as reading. And I'm not talking "trash literature" or anything like that. Reading is having a conversation with the author, maybe it'll take you a whole year to talk with someone about certain topic; maybe you are a really talkative person and want to have chats with a lot of guys.

What's really important is reading. Every book teaches a lesson, although one could argue that not all lessons are good.
I think what you say really makes sense. It's not just about how much you read, but what you read. I guess the real issue is "reading with a purpose," (i.e. what are you trying to achieve or learn.) There's a lot of beneficial information on-line, including scholarly journals and papers. In addition, I'm sure there are also plenty of books you could read that aren't necessarily that informative or educational. So first, it's probably more important set a goal of what you want to achieve with your reading and then maybe dedicate a certain amount of time to reading about it (per day, or per week, whatever fits your schedule.)
 
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Aug 22, 2018
42
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#16
College can leave you with what I call "literature burnout" as most students are forced to read, comprehend and regurgitate a vast amount of written information for an extended period of time. I know after graduating college myself, it was a good six months or so before the urge to just read for the joy of reading started to return. I say don't force it and give you mind the rest it apparently needs.

Also Hladik nailed it when they said reading is reading and it is not limited to what is technically or officially labeled as a book. ^_^

I between articles, news, etc. I average reading 2000 words a day easy.
 

Rae1234

New member
Aug 30, 2018
29
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#17
Before youtube and social media, I was an avid reader and spent hours at the used book store. I still miss the Bodhi Tree bookstore in LA - it closed years ago. I could pick up 5 books for $10. Even used books are expensive now!

Today I am much more able to get information on subjects I'm interested in on youtube or the web. I think there is a tradeoff taking place. There is an opportunity to be exposed to a plethora of ideas through interviews, lectures, and the like at a much higher rate through digital media than we could ever take in through reading. So we trade quantity for quality and depth, but we have exposure to a great many perspectives - far more than otherwise would be possible. At least for me.

I don't think I've finished any of the last few books I've bought. I think I'm attuned to the fast pace of verbal communication.
 
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Sep 6, 2018
15
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Houston, TX
#18
As a young adult, I find that my desire to read is less potent than it was while growing up. I used to get in trouble for reading my favorite novels instead of doing homework; but these days, I just don't have the passion. I'd like to get back to that. I see a lot of folks saying that a schedule helps — I might try that.
 
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Sep 28, 2018
20
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#19
Getting back into reading is a habit just like any other. I found that it was the time/place and convenience of it that mattered in re-forming the habit. When is the best time to carve out 30 minutes a day to read? During breakfast? On your commute (if you take public transit)? During a lunch break? I found that right before bed was not good for me because I got too sleepy. Also, this sounds silly, but do you have a bag or backpack you carry that is easy enough to fit a book into? There are so many times throughout the day we end up waiting around for things. It’s nice to have that book within reach when you are not home and be able to read even a few pages. Good luck!
 
Sep 12, 2018
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#20
I was never much of a bookworm. I liked reading but it wasn’t something I constantly did. I would read when there was some kind of incentive, like a good grade or the Book It! program in elementary/middle school, for those that remember those days...haha.

I went from liking to read, to hating it in middle school and part of high school, then I liked it again when I had an Advanced Placement English class my senior year of high school, where the teacher instructed the class like a college course, where you analyze the books (which I loved to do), not just memorize the events from the book.

I still wasn’t a bookworm. In the back of my mind I actually grew to hate reading because the books assigned never grabbed my interest. Yet, I majored in English in college, go figure! But I always enjoyed analyzing them and reading ones that piqued my interest, which luckily most of them did in college. This aspect is one reason why I chose to study English.

That being said, I probably read a new book a couple times a year. I’ve been trying to do so more often though. I recently read a book that a former classmate of mine self-published and I found another through social media that I really enjoyed. The former being a genre that I don’t typically care for, but it turned out great. I finished them both within the past month, probably two weeks apart. So my reading frequency, I would say, is pretty sporadic!