3-weeks Cigarette Free

Akita

New member
#1
Just posting this because I'm proud of my success and want to have additional motivation to stay consistent. I've smoked cigarettes for the last year and a half, to help deal with the stress of school and work. That proved to be a big mistake; I began to recognize the tell-tale signs of addiction and was disappointed.

For the benefit of my future and my wallet, I quit cigarettes cold turkey three weeks ago. I studied up before doing it, and with the advice of Reddit, decided to not bother with a vape or nicotine delivery alternatives. I no longer experience cravings and am completely nicotine-free.

If you're a smoker who's considering quitting, definitely do it. You'll feel a great deal healthier once you kick the addiction and go through the initial withdrawal symptoms.
 
#3
Congratulations on your smoke-free life! That is such a huge accomplishment! You have every right to be proud!! I would be too. :) Keep on kicking tail!
 
#4
Just posting this because I'm proud of my success and want to have additional motivation to stay consistent. I've smoked cigarettes for the last year and a half, to help deal with the stress of school and work. That proved to be a big mistake; I began to recognize the tell-tale signs of addiction and was disappointed.

For the benefit of my future and my wallet, I quit cigarettes cold turkey three weeks ago. I studied up before doing it, and with the advice of Reddit, decided to not bother with a vape or nicotine delivery alternatives. I no longer experience cravings and am completely nicotine-free.

If you're a smoker who's considering quitting, definitely do it. You'll feel a great deal healthier once you kick the addiction and go through the initial withdrawal symptoms.
Keep up the good work! I know it probably isn't easy, but it will be well worth it. There is a phone app out there that you can track the number of days:hours:minutes you've been smoke free; it shows how much money you've saved to date from not buying cigarettes; it shows the number of cigarettes you've avoided; lastly, it shows how many (mg) of tar you've avoided. It has some other features as well, but it might be worth checking out =) I wanna say it's called MyQuitBuddy or something like that
 
#5
Congratulations! I never really considered myself a smoker other than the occasional pack maybe once every month or two. Recently though I got fairly hooked on Juuls (would not recommend if you’re trying to quit! They’re so strong and so accessible) and realized that I was really craving cigarettes/nicotine. I felt like I was getting into kind of dangerous territory with feeling a need for nicotine rather than just indulging in an occasional cigarette to enjoy once in a while. It’s a hidden blessing that they’re so expensive otherwise I would have had to fight the urge so much more! Next stop is limiting my sugar intake but I’m not sure when that is going to start!
 
#6
I planned to quit "for good" after a similar period of time Friday but decided I don't want to deal with withdrawal until later this week, due to my assumption that I will have less "hell" then. I started inhaling cigars as an alternative to smoking MMJ/MJ...obviously stupid. I remember quitting "cold turkey" as a teenager, with a memory of sitting in my room thinking things kind of sucked for an hour or so but nothing much worse than that before being basically fine in 3-4 days. This time I've gone about that long but have kept going back to it. Nice to read about others and while I've managed to get my strength up to ~16-17 consecutive pullups during the smoking period I know my organs are a vital part of my health that I shouldn't ignore for much longer. A vegetarian diet with lentils and protein shakes for missing meat and standing as much as possible can at least help to compensate organ-wise...but yeah I definitely didn't and don't just want to become a kind of lifelong smoker...or revert to it in another 10-12 years or so!
 
#7
Just posting this because I'm proud of my success and want to have additional motivation to stay consistent. I've smoked cigarettes for the last year and a half, to help deal with the stress of school and work. That proved to be a big mistake; I began to recognize the tell-tale signs of addiction and was disappointed.

For the benefit of my future and my wallet, I quit cigarettes cold turkey three weeks ago. I studied up before doing it, and with the advice of Reddit, decided to not bother with a vape or nicotine delivery alternatives. I no longer experience cravings and am completely nicotine-free.

If you're a smoker who's considering quitting, definitely do it. You'll feel a great deal healthier once you kick the addiction and go through the initial withdrawal symptoms.
Congratulations on your accomplishment; you have every right to be proud of yourself! Quitting is a difficult thing to do, but your lungs and heart will thank you for it. My mom suffered from emphysema secondary to smoking, and it is a horrible thing to watch someone you love slowly die over a matter of years.

How long after you quit did your nicotine cravings cease?
 
#8
Congrats! That's excellent. Have you managed to stay away still?

I was a huge, compulsive smoker when I quit. I had started at 13 and quit at 21 years old. A 7 year curse!

I was so proud of myself for that accomplishment. I was high on it for actually quite a few years. My entire family had been smokers, and I was destined to it. hahaha. I was the first one to quit, and it took a lot. I went back to smoking after I had managed to quit for a few weeks, but that was okay, because I had proven to myself that I could do it. I tried again a few weeks later and that time it stuck.

Do you know that I continued to smoke on the astral plane for several years, and I could even enjoy the smell of a cigarette long after I quit, but not feel any desire to smoke. Eventually even that faded away.

I hope you're still doing well, and if you started again, don't worry too much about it. It's part of the process.
 
#9
Congratulations, this is amazing!! I am proud of you. I smoked cigarettes since I was 17 and I am 22 now and have recently quit in June. Quitting was the best decision I made, especially when I would still smoke them in the past and still feel bad about it. I will admit that there are times when I crave one, but I try my best not to give in. I am around a lot of people who smoke, so walking away from them helps. I would recommend to keep track of how many days it's been since you've quit smoking, and as the number grows, you'll feel more proud of yourself. Keep up the good work!
 
#10
Congratulations! My husband and I both want to quit but have been unable to stick to it! I have been smoking for about 15 years and I hate the example I'm setting for my kids. I am so mad at myself letting this get the better of me. Everyone says cold turkey is the best way to go, I'm encouraged to try again after reading this!
 
#11
Just posting this because I'm proud of my success and want to have additional motivation to stay consistent. I've smoked cigarettes for the last year and a half, to help deal with the stress of school and work. That proved to be a big mistake; I began to recognize the tell-tale signs of addiction and was disappointed.

For the benefit of my future and my wallet, I quit cigarettes cold turkey three weeks ago. I studied up before doing it, and with the advice of Reddit, decided to not bother with a vape or nicotine delivery alternatives. I no longer experience cravings and am completely nicotine-free.

If you're a smoker who's considering quitting, definitely do it. You'll feel a great deal healthier once you kick the addiction and go through the initial withdrawal symptoms.
Congratulations! You should feel so proud of yourself. Please know, we will all be rooting for your continued success. Have you tried any relaxation or meditation techniques to help you deal with stress. This can be very useful in avoiding relapse.

Still, well done! I wish you continued success.
 
#12
Definitely, congratulations! I was a smoker for the last 4 years of life, before I was able to quit (also cold turkey) back in February. After that first month or so, it absolutely becomes a lot easier to not automatically want to go buy a pack. You gradually lose that reactionary/crutch mentality. To prepare you for down the line, though, I would say avoid the nostalgic variety of thinking when it comes to smoking. My grandpa also smoked, throughout his 30+ year career in the Navy, and he said even 20 years later he still thinks about smoking again from time to time. I tend to only think about it now on perfect weather sort of days, like "oh it's so nice out, I'd love to just smoke a cigarette." But I would urge you to resist those kind of thoughts if you have them later on because it's just the mind trying to find any excuse to smoke again and the excuse there for me was oh I can enjoy the outdoors better. Well, that can also be done by just being out there with friends and family and good times. You will inevitably think the thought to smoke, but what works best for me has been to immediately distract my brain with different thoughts and eventually I forget that I even considered it.
 
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